Cartographies of the Imagination:
The Use of GIS and Data Visualisation in the Pursuit of Cultural History

A symposium at Flinders University

3 - 5 September 2010

A map is “a connection made visible. It allows us to see some significant relationships that have so far escaped us.”
Franco Moretti

Humanities researchers studying the history and forms of our culture face new opportunities in the 21st century as we develop ways of using the abundance of information now available to us through digitisation and computer analysis. Digital technologies provide us with powerful new tools to collect, compare and analyse data, but these methods are very different from the traditional approaches of humanities research. What is often called the “data deluge” presents a radical challenge to humanities scholarship, most succinctly expressed by the question, “How do you read a million books?”. Humanities scholars must learn the new skills of what Franco Moretti has called “distant reading” that will allow us to navigate the oceans of data provided by the digitisation of the cultural record, and to and discover and visualise significant patterns across large collections of digital cultural resources. This symposium will explore these issues, bringing together researchers from major Australian cultural research projects with some of the leading international scholars in Digital Humanities.

Programme

Friday, 3 September:

Time

Event

Venue

11.00 – 11.15

Welcome and symposium housekeeping (Associate Professor Robert Phiddian)

Hetzel Lecture Theatre, State Library of South Australia

11.15 – 12.30

Opening Lecture: Professor Ian Gibbins, Anatomy & Histology, Flinders University: “Patterns and Aesthetics: a neuroscience perspective”

Hetzel Lecture Theatre, State Library of South Australia

12.30 – 1.45

Lunch

Hetzel Lecture Theatre, State Library of South Australia

2.00 – 5.00

“Mapping and Art” (session open to the public). Chaired by Ms Fiona Salmon, Director, Flinders University Art Museum.

  • Welcome to Country
  • Susan Stockwell, Transforming the Everyday
  • Professor Howard Morphy, Mapping Blue Mud Bay: art, cartography and cross cultural translation
  • Jonathan Kimberley, Ngipi Ward & Jodie Carnegie Kuluntjarra World Map
  • Panel discussion and audience questions

Ron Radford Auditorium, Art Gallery of South Australia

5.30 – 7.00

Art Exhibition floor talk and opening: “Embody-meant”.

Flinders University City Gallery, State Library of South Australia

7.30

Dinner

 

Saturday, 4 September (“Project Case Studies” day):

Time

Project

Venue

9.15 – 9.30 Tea & coffee, and welcome Room 101, Humanities Building, Flinders University.

9.30 – 10.20

A Literary Atlas of Europe (Ms Anne-Kathrin Reuschel)

Room 101, Humanities Building, Flinders University.

10.30 – 11.00

Morning tea

Room 101, Humanities Building, Flinders University.

11.00 – 11.50

Going to the Show (Professor Robert Allen)

Room 101, Humanities Building, Flinders University.

12.00 – 12.50

A Cultural Atlas of Australia: Mediated Spaces in Theatre, Film and Literature (Dr Stephen Carleton, Dr Jane Stadler, Dr Peta Mitchell)

Room 101, Humanities Building, Flinders University.

1.00 – 2.00

Lunch

Room 133, Humanities Building, Flinders University.

2.00 – 2.50

MappingMovies.com (Associate Professor Jeffrey Klenotic)

Room 101, Humanities Building, Flinders University.

3.00 – 3.50

Mapping the Movies (Dr Kate Bowles, Associate Professor Deb Verhoeven, Ms Alwyn Davidson)

Room 101, Humanities Building, Flinders University.

4.00 – 4.30

Afternoon tea

Room 101, Humanities Building, Flinders University.

4.30 – 5.20

AusStage (Dr Jonathan Bollen)

Room 101, Humanities Building, Flinders University.

7.00

Dinner

Details TBA.

Sunday, 5 September:

Time

Event

Location

10.30 – 11.30

Respondent: Dr Christie Carson responds to projects described on previous day

Flinders University Art Museum

11.30 – 12.30

Deconstruction: small group discussions

Flinders University Art Museum

12.30 – 1.30

Reconstruction: final discussion session, chaired by Professor Richard Maltby

Flinders University Art Museum

1.30 – 2.30

Lunch

Flinders University Art Museum/Lakeside Walk

2.30

Close

 

----------------------------

Venue details

The Hetzel Lecture Theatre is situated in the historic Institute Building (corner of North Terrace and Kintore Avenue, Adelaide), and is now part of the State Library of South Australia complex; the Flinders University City Gallery is also located within the State Library of South Australia.

The Ron Radford Auditorium is part of the Art Gallery of South Australia, situated a short distance (a two minute walk along North Terrace) east of the State Library.

The Humanities Building is located on the Flinders University Campus, adjacent to the Matthew Flinders Theatre. It is Building number 31 on the campus map, on Humanities Road, in the North Ridge precinct of the campus (the red area).

The Flinders University Art Museum houses the university’s extensive collection of over 4,500 artworks. It is located on the Ground Floor of Social Sciences North, Building number 32 on the campus map, in the North Ridge precinct of the campus (the red area). Best access is via Humanities Road.

----------------------------

Further information about participants' projects:

----------------------------

Public Forum: "Mapping and Art".

Download the forum brochure.

In conjunction with the symposium, the School of Humanities and the Flinders University Art Museum are holding a free public forum exploring the politics and aesthetics of map-making through the lens of contemporary arts practice, at the Ron Radford Auditorium, Art Gallery of South Australia, from 2.00 to 5.00 p.m. on Friday 3 September 2010.

The Forum will feature presentations by British artist Susan Stockwell, Professor Howard Morphy (Director of the Research School of Humanities at the Australian National University), and artists Jonathan Kimberley, Ngipi Ward & Jodie Carnegie.

Susan Stockwell’s work is concerned with issues of ecology, mapping, trade and global commerce. She uses the everyday, domestic and industrial disposable products that pervade our everyday lives and transforms them into extraordinary objects. A part-time Professor of Fine Art in the school of Architecture and Visual Art at The University of East London, Susan has taught extensively and taken part in residencies and projects in Europe, America and Asia, and exhibited in galleries and museums internationally including the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the National Museum of China in Beijing and the Katonah Museum of Art in America. Her presentation is titled, “Transforming the Everyday”.

Professor Howard Morphy, Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Research School of Humanities at the Australian National University, has conducted more than 25 years research with the Yolngu people of eastern Arnhem Land in Northern Australia and has written widely on Aboriginal art, the anthropology of art and visual culture. His talk is titled, “Mapping Blue Mud Bay: art, cartography, performance and cross-cultural translation”.

Jonathan Kimberley is an Australian artist whose practice combines solo and collaborative insights into Western definitions of 'landscape' and 'country'. He has exhibited nationally in group and solo exhibitions and internationally as part of From an Island South, an exhibition toured by Asialink in 2006. Together with Ngipi Ward and Jodie Carnegie, he will be talking about the Kuluntjarra World Map, a work made with Kayili Artists in Ngaanyatjarra country in the Gibson Desert, Western Australia, in 2008-09.

Ngipi Ward is a painter of growing reputation and one of Kayili artists who collaborated with Jonathan Kimberley on Kuluntjarra World Map.

Jodie Carnegie is an emerging Ngaanyatjarra artist. They live in the remote community of Patjarr, also known as Karilwara, in the Gibson Desert. Ngipi and her family were the subject of "People of the Australian Western Desert", a documentary by anthropologist, Ian Dunlop, produced by the Australian Commonwealth Film Unit in 1965. Jodie and Ngipi are both represented by Kayili Artists, a community based arts organization established in 2004.

 

The "Cartographies of the Imagination" project is supported by an ISL-HCA International Collaborative Workshop grant,
and by the Flinders Humanities Research Centre.